The Forgotten Spy: The Untold Story of India’s Youngest Covert Agent, Saraswathi Rajamani

Sixty-nine years after India finally got its hard won independence, the courage and contributions of many little known freedom fighters have faded away from public memory. Largely overlooked by writers and historians, these men and women laid the foundation of India’s freedom from the British. One such unacknowledged heroine is a woman few Indians know about, a woman who lived a life of intrigue and danger to help her nation fight colonial rule.

The woman was India’s youngest spy, 16-year-old Saraswathy Rajamani, who smuggled secrets for the Indian National Army’s intelligence wing.

Saraswathi Rajamani was born in Burma, in a family of freedom fighters, in 1927. Rajamani grew up in a liberal household where there was little to no restrictions for the girls. The deeply patriotic girl was barely 10 when she met Mahatma Gandhi, who was visiting their palatial home in Rangoon.

"Shocked to see the child with a gun, Gandhi ji asked Rajamani why she needed a gun."

“To shoot down the Britishers, of course,” she crisply answered, without even looking at him.

“Violence is not the answer, little girl. We are fighting the British through non-violent ways. You should also do that,” Gandhi ji urged.

“We shoot and kill the looters, don’t we? The British are looting India, and I am going to shoot at least one Britisher when I grow up,” said a determined Rajamani.


Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose and Captain Lakshmi Sehgal with INA’s all-women brigade
She was just 16 when Bose visited Rangoon at the height of World War II to collect funds and recruit volunteers for INA. Unlike Gandhi ji and the INC, Bose urged everyone to take up arms to liberate India from British rule. Deeply impressed with his fiery speech, Rajamani removed all her expensive gold and diamond jewellery and donated it to the INA.

This magnanimous action did not fail to attract the attention of Bose who, on enquiring, found out that Rajamani was the daughter of one of the wealthiest Indians in Rangoon. The very next day, he arrived at Rajamani’s residence to return all the jewellery.

On meeting Rajamani’s father, Bose said, “Due to her innocence, she gave away all her jewellery. So, I have come to return it.”

While her father, a freedom fighter who had himself made massive donations to Bose’s cause, simply smiled in reply, an indignant Rajamani said, “They are not my father’s, they are mine. I gave all of them to you, and I will not take them back.”

So stubborn was the teenager that Bose could not but admire her determination. He told her, “Lakshmi (money) comes and goes but not Saraswathi. You have the wisdom of Saraswathi. Hence, I name you Saraswathi.” This was how Rajamani became Saraswathi Rajamani from that day onwards.

Disguised as young boys, the girls started working as errand boys at British military camps and officers’ houses. As covert agents behind enemy lines, they were responsible for intercepting government orders and military intelligence from the British officers and handing these over to INA.

Rajamani (as a boy her name was Mani) and her friends masqueraded as boys for almost two years to gather intelligence on British movements. While the unit had been told to avoid getting caught at all costs, one of the girls was once caught by the British. Knowing the consequences of being caught, Rajamani decided that she would try and rescue her fellow spy.The gutsy teenager dressed herself as a dancing girl, drugged the officers at the prison, and rescued her colleague. As the girls were escaping, they were shot at by the Britishers and Rajamani suffered a bullet wound in her right leg. Still bleeding as she ran, Rajamani and her friend climbed up a tree, where they camped for three days while the British carried out their search operation.

The bullet wound left her with a permanent limp, but Rajamani was proud of it. For her, it was a reminder of her exciting days as an INA spy.When INA was disbanded after the British won the war, Saraswathi and the other INA members returned to India on Netaji’s instructions.

Saraswathi Rajamani and her family gave away everything they had and made their way to India. Sadly, the family that gave everything they had to the freedom struggle, had to live a life of penury on their return to India.

Age has hardly withered Rajamani’s spirit and determination to serve her nation. Even at this old age, she visits tailor shops and collects cloth scraps as well as rejected fabrics from them. She uses these materials to make clothes that she then donates to orphanages and old age homes. During the devastating tsunami of 2006, she also donated her meagre monthly pension as a freedom fighter to the relief fund.

Somehow, history tends to forget this women. Many heroines, who walked shoulder to shoulder with the men during trying times, still remain in the shadows, their faces forgotten and their bravery unsung. Saraswathi Rajamani is one such heroine, a woman whose exceptional bravery and intelligence deserves to be recognised and respected by her country.

A Big Salute To The Ten Daredevils Who Overcame Their Impairments And Impacted The Society With Their Personal Intuition And Extraordinary Acts

They blossomed to explore the hidden celebrity in themselves, they influenced our culture by striking revolutions and overall, they actualized us that WE CAN DO IT to live out on our dreams, despite of physical barriers-



10. Sudha Chandran: A lady of sheer determination, Sudha Chandran is counted among one of the most celebrated Bharatnatyam dancers of the Indian subcontinent.
Holder of master degree in Economics, her right leg was amputated in 1981, due to Gangrene but this lady of incredible will-power defeated her impairment and fixed an artificial leg. After slow down of two years, she was back in her profession with the thunderous applause across the world. Apart from her dancing skills, she is also known for her astounding performances in Indian movies and television series.


 

9. Patrick Henry Hughes:

What more can I say about this dynamic and inspiring soul? This multi-instrumental musician was

born blind on March 10, 1988, along with crippled limbs. An inborn patient of bilateral anophthalmia and hip dysplasia, Hughes was backed up by his father, who introduced him to piano at the early age of nine months. Hughes was spotlighted by media, when in 2006, as a student of University of Louisville, he played trumpet in the Louisville Marching Band where his father was pushing him on a wheelchair. After the exposure of his extraordinary talent, he was subsequently invited to perform across the country.


8. Liz Murray:

Chuck out the barriers and go ahead !! Elizabeth Murray was born on September 23, 1980, to drug
addicted parents in a filthy apartment of New York. At the early age of 15, this girl became roofless when her mother died of AIDS and father moved to a homeless shelter. Sometimes on park benches and sometimes on subways, she spent her nights in extremely baneful environments but she never missed the chance to read encyclopedias, recovered from the public trash boxes. Driven by persistence and obsession for hard work, she never surrendered in her way and finally she got listed in the Harvard University. Presently, Liz is an eminent inspirational speaker as well as director of a company, which empower grownups to make something innovative in their lives.
7. Randy Pausch:It’s not about how to achieve your dreams, it’s about how to lead your life, … If you lead your life the
right way, the karma will take care of itself, the dreams will come to you. Professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, Randy Pausch became the victim of pancreatic cancer in September 2006 and died on July 25, 2008, due to its complications. The thing which made him famous was his one-of-a-kind lecture, Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams, delivered on September 18, 2007, at CMU auditorium. His flashing performance and a clean-cut approach to experience the life was watched by millions of Internet viewers, which became a sensation between international media and later, it was converted in a book, which has been translated in 35 different languages.

6. Sean Swarner:Considered as a medical wonder, Sean Swarner has defeated the two deadly stages of cancer,
Hodgkin’s disease and Askin’s sarcoma, respectively at the ages of 13 and 15. A live validation of victory over all odds, Sean is the first cancer survivor to climb the torturous Mount Everest, despite of life threatening circumstances. However, he still says, Frankly I don’t know why I’m alive, but this daredevil never misses a chance to participate in presentations and expeditions, organized to give hope to the cancer patients.


5. Jessica Cox:
Well known for being the first pilot to fly a plane using only feet, Jessica Cox was born without arms but this deficiency was ineffective to stop this wonder lady from capturing her goals. A graduate in psychology, holder of two black belts in Taekwondo, fond of fast driving, Jessica can also type 25 words/minute on computer and surprisingly she can put contact lenses in eyes, using her feet. She also works as a motivational speaker and encourages disable people to change their stereotyped mentality.



4. Ludwig van Beethoven:
One of the most celebrated phenomenon among romantic and classical composers, Beethoven wasborn in the family of musicians in Germany. During the adolescent, his hearing ability began to deteriorate and later he became completely deaf but this disability didn’t trespassed his caliber of composing. Promoter of the modern symphony orchestra, Beethoven has established himself as a master legend in the musical arena.
3. Helen Keller:
Inspiration of a movie The Miracle Worker, Helen Keller was the first deaf and blind person to earn the degree of Bachelor of Arts. She was also an authoritative member of the Socialist Party of America where she openly criticized the policies of Woodrow Wilson. An illustrious author of 12 books and winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Helen devoted her later life to work for the American Foundation for Blind.  

   

2. Nick Vujicic:
Victim of a rare disease Tetra-amelia syndrome, which is characterized by the absence of all four limbs, Nick Vujicic was born on december 4, 1982, in a Serbian family, in Australia. Throughout his childhood, he struggled a lot to overcome the sick mentality of society and finally at the age of 17, he established an NGO Life Without Limbs. After graduating in Accounting and Financial Planning, he started his journey as a motivational speaker of subjects revolving around meaning of life, hope and disability.

1. Stephen Hawking:
Not only does God play dice, but… he sometimes throws them where they cannot be seen. Sure enough, this genius, victim of a motor neuron disease, has changed the world by his revolutionary theories. Completely paralyzed with his legs, arms and voice, Hawking’s wheelchair is attached with a computer system which is operated by an infrared ‘blink switch.’ This renowned cosmologist and Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts is admired among tech pundits for his works on gravitational singularities, black holes along with his best seller A Brief History of Time.




source - topyaps

THE AMAZING STORY OF 21 BRAVE SIKHS, WHO FOUGHT AGAINST 10,000 INVADERS - THE BATTLE OF SARAGARHI (12-SEP-1897)




On the Samana Range of the Hindu Kush mountains in Pakistan, the British Army built a small communications post at Saragarhi, to be housed by an equally small contingent of soldiers. The region had always been a troubled area, and during the last quarter of the 19th century, British India’s hold on the North West Frontier was tenuous. In fact, several expeditions had been sent to maintain control and suppress rebellion in the region in the years immediately preceding the Saragarhi battle.

Equipped with a heliograph, Saragarhi transmitted messages by using flashes of sunlight, sent much like telegraphic communication (read: Morse code). The flashes themselves were made by either pivoting a mirror or interrupting a beam of light.

In the summer of 1897, things were getting tense in the region, and the British had only recently ended an uprising of Pashtun tribesmen in the Malakand region (known later as the Siege of Malakand) in early August. By the end of the month, there was a general uprising of Afghans, and by the beginning of September, Pashtuns were actively attempting to capture British Army positions, including attacks on Fort Gulistan on September 3 and September 9.

To combat the Pashtun offenses, troops were sent from Fort Lockhart to reinforce Fort Gulistan, and after the battle on the 9th, on their return trip, a few soldiers were left to reinforce the small detachment at Saragarhi. All of the 21 soldiers remaining at Saragarhi were members of the 36th Sikh Regiment of the British Army, and the contingent was led by Havildar Ishar Singh.

On September 12, 1897, in an effort to prevent any further communications between Forts Lockhart and Gulistan, 10,000 Pashtuns attacked Saragarhi, beginning at about 9 a.m.

Since Saragarhi was a communications post, almost the entire battle was broadcast in real time by its signal man, Sardar Gurmukh Singh, which is why we today know what exactly happened there when 21 faced off against 10,000.

Shortly after the attack began, Gurmukh Singh signaled for aid to Lieutenant Colonel John Haughton at Fort Lockhart, but he was told that immediate help was unavailable. Undeterred, the Sikh soldiers committed to fighting to the last to prevent the encroaching Pashtuns from reaching the other forts.

The first man injured was Bhagwan Singh, and sometime after, the invaders broke part of the wall of the picket. Offers were made to the Sikhs in exchange for surrender, but they were refused. The Sikhs were trying to buy as much time as possible for the other forts to be reinforced, and were willing to pay for that time with their lives. After two unsuccessful attempts at the gates, the Pashtun forces eventually breached the wall. Fierce hand-to-hand fighting ensued.

Shortly before the end, Ishar Singh ordered his men to retreat even further while he remained behind in defense. He, too, fell, during that charge, as did all of the remaining soldiers except for the heliograph operator, Gurmukh Singh. Gurmukh was the last to die, after being burned to death when the Pashtuns set fire to the post. He is reported to have repeatedly yelled until the end, the Sikh battle cry, “Bole So Nihal, Sat Sri Akal,” meaning “Shout aloud in ecstasy! True is the great Timeless One.”

Although no Sikh survived the battle, their sacrifice sufficiently delayed the Pashtuns such that reinforcements were able to arrive at the Pashtuns’ ultimate target, Fort Gulistan, in time to stop its fall.

In addition to the 21 Sikh dead, reports of Pashtun losses range from between 180 and 600, though it’s difficult to discern the true number accurately. That said, it was probably at least 180 as that is what the Pashtuns themselves later reported as their losses in that battle.


For their sacrifice, each of the Sikh soldiers were awarded the Indian Order of Merit, the highest award for gallantry then given to Indian soldiers by the British.

In addition, Saragarhi Day is celebrated each year on September 12 to commemorate the battle.

Saragarhi, itself, was little more than a small block house and a signaling tower. It was constructed to enable communications between Fort Lockhart and Fort Gulistan, two more significant British posts situated on either side of Saragarhi, albeit several miles apart.

source- todayifoundout.com

Narayanan Krishnan: The Story of A Chef Who Dedicated His Life to Feeding The Homeless

Narayanan Krishnan, an award winning chef at the Taj, a five star hotel in India, was on his way to take up a job in an elite hotel in Switzerland after being shortlisted from thousands of hopefuls.In 2002, Krishnan witnessed an incident which had lead him to give up his dream job and dedicate his life to provide support and food to the homeless and destitute people in his home town of Madurai, India.


"I saw a very old man eating his own human waste for food," Krishnan said. "It really hurt me so much. I was literally shocked for a second. After that, I started feeding that man and decided this is what I should do the rest of my lifetime."

Krishnan was visiting a temple in the south Indian city of Madurai in 2002 when he saw the man under a bridge. Krishnan quit his job within the week and returned home for good, convinced of his new destiny.

"That spark and that inspiration is a driving force still inside me as a flame -- to serve all the mentally ill destitutes and people who cannot take care of themselves," Krishnan said.

Krishnan founded his nonprofit Akshaya Trust in 2003. Now 29, he has served more than 1.2 million meals breakfast, lunch and dinner -- to India's homeless and destitute, mostly elderly people abandoned by their families and often abused.

"Because of the poverty India faces, so many mentally ill people have been ... left uncared [for] on the roadside of the city," he said.

Krishnan's day begins at 4 a.m. He and his team cover nearly 125 miles in a donated van, routinely working in temperatures topping 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

He seeks out the homeless under bridges and in the nooks and crannies between the city's temples. The hot meals he delivers are simple, tasty vegetarian fare he personally prepares, packs and often hand-feeds to nearly 400 clients each day.

Krishnan carries a comb, scissors and razor and is trained in eight haircut styles that, along with a fresh shave, provide extra dignity to those he serves.

"The panic, suffering of the human hunger is the driving force of me and my team members of Akshaya," he said. "I get this energy from the people. The food which I cook ... the enjoyment which they get is the energy. I see the soul. I want to save my people."

The group's operations cost about $327 a day, but sponsored donations only cover 22 days a month. Krishnan subsidizes the shortfall with $88 he receives in monthly rent from a home his grandfather gave him. Krishnan sleeps in Akshaya's modest kitchen with his few co-workers. Since investing his entire savings of $2,500 in 2002, he has taken no salary and subsists with the help of his once un-supportive parents.

"They had a lot of pain because they had spent a lot on my education," he said. "I asked my mother, 'Please come with me, see what I am doing.' After coming back home, my mother said, 'You feed all those people, the rest of the lifetime I am there, I will feed you.' I'm living for Akshaya. My parents are taking care of me."

Cooking for over 450 homeless people a day, providing breakfast, lunch and dinner Krishnan has spent the last 12 years of his life serving more than 1.2 million meals to the people of India.

"Now I am feeling so comfortable and so happy," he says. "I have a passion, I enjoy my work. I want to live with my people."

Guinness Rishi : The Motivating Indian Who is Holding 74 World Records




Original Name - Har Parkash
Born On - July 7, 1942
Aim - Demonstrating that his goal is setting new Guiness records.

WORLD RECORDS ALREADY BROKEN/CREATED

1- Longest He na Tattoo 63 ft. 2574 Links one hr. Created by Ms. Juhi 16-08-09
2- 755 Drinking straws of 5mm. outer dia in mouth (after removing all teeth)
3- Longest distance Domino Pizza Hand delivered 12,431 KM. on 10th sep. 2001 from New Delhi to 4- Ripley’s museum, san Francisco, U.S.A.
5- Non-Stop scooter riding 30,965 km. in 1001 hrs. by 3 riders.
6- Longest will of the world 489 pages 1,04,567 characters
6- Oldest adoptee 61 years 7 Months 22 days
7- Longest lease of the world
8- Shortest will of Bimla Rishi
9- Longest Domain Name
10- Longest URL of 71 Characters
11- Smallest Holding Half by Half Inch
12- Smallest Greeting Card 4 mm long, 2mm wide
13- Smallest Holy Book Quran
14- Tallest Sugar cube Tower
15- Smallest Will engraved on one inch Brass Disc, 499 characters
16- Son’s Wedding smallest invitation card He is holding 74 World Record's presently and still counting.

Source: guinnessworldrecords & guinnessrishiworldrecords.

The Water Car : Invented by Mohammad Raees Markani, India (Madhya Pradesh)

Mohammad Raees Markani from Madhya Pradesh has invented a car that runs on water. This 12th pass took five years to develop the final product. The car runs on acetylene gas, which is formed from a chemical reaction between calcium carbide and water. Raees now has a patent for his water car. According to Mirror, Raees has been modifying an 800 cc engine for the last five years – and now believes he has made the scientific breakthrough. The eco-friendly car uses a mix of water and carbides. Cost per KM is just half only Rs 3/ KM against gasoline Rs 6 / KM.

Raees who has been a mechanic for the last 15 years told Mirror, “The gas is used for several industrial purposes including welding and portable lighting for miners. But in my case, I am using it to propel the car engines . I have made other changes to the engines, which helps the overall performance of the car. So basically, it is just about the water.”

“The market for environmentally friendly cars is getting bigger and automobile companies around the world are looking for eco-friendly ways to reduce pollution. So a car like mine can be a good alternative. It costs close to nothing to operate and it is environment friendly,” added Raees.

The Chinese automobile companies have invited Raees to develop the idea further. All the companies that are interested in Raees’s water car project will have to meet his one condition – any plant to make new cars will be established only in his hometown in Madhya Pradesh. “I want things to change in my hometown. So this is where my work should continue,” Raees stated.

Data Source : social.yourstory.com

The Man Who Couldn't Even Walk, Ran The World’s Fastest Mile

BEFORE:

Once, a young school boy was caught in a fire accident in his school and was assumed that he would not live. His mother was told that he was sure to die, for the terrible fire had devastated the lower half of his body. Even if he were to survive, he would be a cripple throughout his life.

But the brave boy did not want to die nor did he want to be a cripple. Much to be the amazement of the doctor, he did survive. But unfortunately from his waist down, he had no motor ability. His thin legs just dangled there, lifeless. Ultimately he was discharged from the hospital. But his determination to walk was indomitable. At home, when he was not in bed, he was confined to a wheelchair. One day, he threw himself from the chair and pulled himself across the grass, dragging his legs behind him. He reached the picket fence, raised himself up and then stake by stake, he began dragging himself along the fence, his resolve to walk undeterred. He did this every day, with faith in himself that he would be able to walk unaided. With his iron persistence and his resolute determination, he did develop the ability to stand up, then to walk haltingly, then to walk by himself and then to run.


AFTER:


He began to walk to school, then run to school, to run for the sheer joy of running. Later in college he made the track team.

 In February 1934, in New York City’s famed Madison Square Garden, this young man who was not expected to survive, who would surely never walk, who could never hope to run – this determined young man, Dr. Glenn Cunningham, ran the world’s fastest mile.


An epitome of the power of positive thinking and faith in one’s self, Glenn Cunningham continues to be an inspiration for many, and his story, a brilliant testimony to how one can bounce back even when all odds are stacked against one, to the extent that death seemed the preferable option.


Data Source : Storypick.

Dashrath Manjhi : Mountain Man


One of the inspiring story that I came across a long time back is of Dashrath Manjhi. He received the appellation "Mountain Man" after he carved a path 360-foot-long (110 m) through-cut, 25-foot-deep (7.6 m) in places and 30-foot-wide (9.1 m) to form a road through a mountain in the Gehlour hills, working day and night for 22 years from 1960 to 1982.

But why would he do such a humongous task? Such motivation stirred from the loss of his wife, Falguni Devi, as she was unable to receive a medical treatment in time because the nearest town with a doctor was 70 kilometers (43 mi) away from their village in Bihar, India. Moreover, kids of the village have to take up an arduous task of walking miles to attend school. To ameliorate the pain of thousands and not letting anyone suffer the same fate as his wife inspired him to create a short-cut through the mountain, reducing the distance between the Atri and Wazirganj blocks of the Gaya district from 55 km to 15 km, bringing him the national acclaim.


He died on August 17, 2007 and was given a state funeral by the Government of Bihar. What this story inspires me is that hope is the best thing, maybe, one of those thing that drives your will; though he was ridiculed by his fellow villagers, calling him 'stupid' for taking up such an impossible task, nevertheless, his sheer determination made him strive for straight 22 years because he hoped: to make things easy for his people, to assuage the pain caused by the mountain, and that humanity - with will - can transmute the impossible into possible, as is show in the above image.

Sindhutai Sapkal : The Mother of Orphans


Sou. Sindhutai Sapkal also known as Mother of Orphans is an Indian social worker and social activist known particularly for her work for raising orphan children.

At the age of nine, she was married to a man with the age difference of 21 years. Her husband was a 30-year-old cattle-herder, who would often beat her for no reasons. At the age 20, she was deserted by her husband and thrown out of her house along with an infant baby girl. She landed up on a railway station and tried to commit suicide twice to end her gruesome life.But she decided not to give up and fight against the cruelty of male dominated society.

“I was told there are only two processions in a woman’s life; once when she gets married and the other when she dies. Imagine my state of mind when they took me in a procession to my husband’s home in Navargaon forest in Wardha"- Sindhutai Sapkal

During the homelessness, she came across dozens of street children and orphans living pathetic lives. A day, she got up with a resolve to fight for them and give them a better and decent life. Her courage and determination encouraged others to come up with their helping hands. Years passed and now she has nurtured over 1050 orphaned children. As of today, she has a grand family of 207 son-in-laws, 36 daughter-in-laws and over 1000 grandchildren.

“When I was out myself on the streets begging for food and fighting for survival each day, I realized that there are so many orphans who have nobody to go to. I decided to take care of them and raise them as my own” - Sindhutai Sapkal

Many of the children that she adopted are well educated lawyers and doctors, and some including her biological daughter are running their independent orphanages. One of her child is doing PHD on her life. Till date she is honored by 272 awards. She used all that money to buy land to make home for her orphan children.

Srikanth Bolla : The blind CEO of a 50 crore company


He is the CEO of Hyderabad-based Bollant Industries, an organisation that employs uneducated and disabled employees to manufacture eco-friendly, disposable consumer packaging solutions, which is worth Rs 50 crores. Sounds nothing great right? Here comes the twist in the tail. He was born blind into an agricultural family in Sitaramapuram village in Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh, India. After his birth villagers in his family advised his mother and father to let him die.
"Many questions bothered me. Why should a disabled child be pushed to the back row in the class? Why should the 10 percent of the disabled population of India be left out of the Indian economy?"

In school, he was pushed to the back bench and was not allowed to play. He excelled in studies and scored above 90 percent in his class 10 examinations. Indian Institute of Technology and BITS Pilani has closed its doors citing his disability. He applied to the top Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and now he is all set to finish his studies in Computer Science and Business Management, and started a computer-training centre for visually challenged students. The centre now trains 30 blind high school students each year, but with more funding, he hopes to add more computers and more students. Bolla was quoted in MIT journal, where he said, “I want to dedicate my life to community and social service. I want a place in society where people look up to me as a role model and great leader”. He wants to pursue an MBA in an institute like Harvard and become India's president.

Srikanth with late President of India Dr APJ Abdul Kalam
Today, Srikanth has four production plants, one each in Hubli (Karnataka) and Nizamabad (Telangana), and two in Hyderabad (Telangana). Another plant, which will be one hundred percent solar operated, is coming up in Sri City, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Angel investor Ravi Mantha was impressed with his business acumen and vision for his company that he not only decided to mentor him but also invested in Srikanth’s company.They are raising $2-million (around Rs 13 crores) in funding and have already raised Rs 9 crores. His vision is to build a sustainable company with a workforce comprising 70 percent people with disability.

Palam Kalyanasundaram : Man of the Millenium

“Everything is a state of mind. Finally, what do we take with us when we leave planet earth?”

73-year-old Tamil Nadu librarian donated Rs 30 crore to the uneducated poor

This man, an Indian, received "Man of the Millennium" from an American organization.

The reason they awarded will put to shame many of the celebrities who are treated as demi-gods in India.

Kalyanasundaram, has donated his entire salary in his whole lifetime to the welfare of the society for various social causes ranging from child welfare to free hand donations . He used to do laundry and server jobs for his daily needs. He is unmarried and also donated his family share to various social causes.

He donated the entire amount which he got with the award also to the underprivileged. And Just for facts, the amount was 30 crores.

The Missile Man of India : Dr APJ Abdul Kalam

The person who inspired every countrymen. He always dreamed for a better society and a better nation. He was a great man who changed our country, a great inspiration for the youth like me and a great model for all.

Sir Kalam demonstrated the great potential for dynamism and innovations. Agni, Pritvi, Akash, Trishul and Nag- missiles that have become household names in India and have raised the nation to the level of a missile power of international reckoning. After graduating from Madras Institute of Technology (MIT – Chennai) in 1960, he joined Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) as a scientist. Sir Kalam started his career by designing a small helicopter for the Indian Army, but remained unconvinced with the choice of his job at DRDO. Later Sir Kalam was transferred to the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) where he was the project director of India's first indigenous Satellite Launch Vehicle (SLV-III) which successfully deployed the Rohini satellite near earth's orbit in July 1980. Joining ISRO was one of his biggest achievements in Sir Kalam's life.

Dr. A P J Abdul Kalam's 79th birthday was recognized as World Student's Day by United Nations. He has also received honorary doctorates from 40 universities. The Government of India has honoured him with the Padma Bhushan in 1981 and the Padma Vibhushan in 1990 for his work with ISRO and DRDO and his role as a scientific advisor to the Government. In 1997, Kalam received India's highest civilian honour, the Bharat Ratna, for his immense and valuable contribution to the scientific research and modernization of defence technology in India. In 2005, Switzerland declared 26 May as science day to commemorate Kalam's visit in the country. In 2013, he was the recipient of the Von Braun Award from the National Space Society "to recognize excellence in management of and leadership for a space-related project."

At the same time he helped to create India's awesome weaponry and maintained the rigour of his personal life, working 18 hours a day and practicing veena and loving literature. With the characteristics of modesty, Kalam ascribes the greatness of his achievements to the influence of his teachers and parents. He was a simple and ordinary person who have experience a lot of struggle in his youth and boy hood. He came from a poor background and started working at an early age to supplement his family's income. His dream was to become a pilot and fly high ,but narrowly missed achieving his dream of becoming a fighter pilot, as he placed ninth in qualifiers, and only eight positions were available in the Indian Air Force (IAF).On July 25,2002 he was sworn in as the eleventh president of India and governed India succeeding K.R Narayanan.

Dr Kalam set a target of interacting with 100,000 students during the two years after his resignation from the post of scientific adviser in 1999. He loved to interact with students by saying- "I feel comfortable in the company of young people, particularly high school students. Henceforth, I intend to share with them experiences, helping them to ignite their imagination and preparing them to work for a developed India for which the road map is already available. ''He continued to interact with students during his term as a President and also during his post-presidency period as a visiting professor at Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad and Indian Institute of Management Indore, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology Thiruvananthapuram, and a visiting faculty at many other academic and research institutions across India. He is strong supporter of Space based solar power. He continues to take an active interest in other developments in the field of science and technology.

Dr Kalam felt that the biggest problem faced within the youths of our country was the lack of clarity of vision, the lack of direction. The poor children living in obscure place, in an unprivileged social setting may find a little solace in the way his destiny has been shaped and helped them to liberate themselves from the bondage of their illusory backwardness and hopelessness.

About Dr. Kalam’s Journey of life

Kalam was born on 15th October 1931 and raised in Rameswaram, Tamil Nadu, and studied physics and aerospace engineering. He spent the next four decades as a scientist and science administrator, mainly at the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and was intimately involved in India's civilian space program and military missile development efforts. He thus came to be known as the Missile Man of India for his work on the development of ballistic missile and launch vehicle technology.

He also played a pivotal organizational, technical, and political role in India's Pokhran-II nuclear tests in 1998, the first since the original nuclear test by India in 1974.

From 'Missile Man' to 'People's President'

Kalam was elected as the 11th President of India in 2002 with the support of both the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party and the then-opposition Indian National Congress and had served 5 years to the nation. Widely referred to as the "People's President”, he returned to his civilian life of education, writing and public service after a single term. He was a recipient of several prestigious awards, including the Bharat Ratna, India's highest civilian honour.

Role model for students

A vegetarian bachelor, Kalam was quoted as saying that like most of the technology he spearheaded, he himself was "Made in India", having never been trained abroad.

Kalam succeeded K R Narayanan and served a full five-year term from 2002 until 2007 after he won the presidential elections which was a highly one-sided contest with Lakshmi Sahgal, a revolutionary of the Indian Independence movement, as his rival. He secured the backing of all political parties.

A role model for students and young people Kalam was always happy to be among them and educational institutions. He breathed his last in the premises of an educational institution.


Death

While delivering a lecture at the Indian Institute of Management Shillong, Kalam collapsed and died from an apparent cardiac arrest on 27 July 2015, aged 83. Thousands including national-level dignitaries attended the funeral ceremony held in his hometown of Rameshwaram, where he was buried with full state honours.

(Source : Hindustan Times, Wikipedia and India.yourstory.com)

Pranav Dhanawade : The Boy Who Scored 1009 runs in a single match

Well not exactly a success story but it was highly inspiring to know about the 15 year old boy who broke a 116 year old record in cricket. 
His name is Pranav Dhanawade. He scored 1009 runs of his own in a single match.

Pranav, whose father drives an autorickshaw, may have grown up in Kalyan, not quite the cricketing artery of Mumbai, only showed coolth and great self-confidence. His nervous father revealed to this reporter that he often worked overtime to provide Pranav two square meals and cricketing gear. Inspired by Prithvi Shaw's Harris Shield feat, Pranav had vowed to his father on Monday that he would get to a score that would be near-impossible to surpass. His unbeaten knock of 1009, an innings laced with 129 fours and 59 sixes off 327 deliveries has forever put Kalyan on the cricketing map.



Salute!

Source: Pranav Dhanawade's record feat hides more than it reveals - Times of India

Michael Jeffrey Jordan


“I can accept failure, everyone fails at something. But I can’t accept not trying.”

Jordan suffered his first set-back in his sophomore year when he was left out of the varsity basketball team, because he was only 5’9” at that time and his taller classmate Leroy Smith had won the last spot on the team.

He made up his mind that he would never have to face a similar situation ever again and started practicing every day after that, making it a point to take out time for his practice daily without fail. He soon shot up to 6’3”, made the team the next year and never had to look back after that.

From being a part of two gold-medal winning teams at the Olympics to winning NBA’s Most Valuable Player Award five times in his career, Jordan dominated the sports field for more than a decade in the ‘90s.

Neerja Bhanot - The Heroine Of The Hijack

The Heroine Of The Hijack

She was a flight attendant for Pan Am, based in Mumbai, India, who was murdered while saving passengers from terrorists on board the hijacked Pan Am Flight 73 on 5 September 1986. Posthumously, she became the youngest recipient of India's highest peacetime military award for bravery, the Ashok Chakra.

Bhanot was the senior flight purser on the ill-fated Pan Am Flight 73, which was hijacked by four heavily armed terrorists after it landed at Karachi at 5 am from Mumbai. PA 73 was en route to Frankfurt and onward to New York City. Bhanot, being the senior-most cabin crew member on board, took charge.

The hijackers were part of the terrorist Abu Nidal Organization and were backed by Libya. The terrorists then instructed Bhanot to collect the passports of all the passengers so that they could identify the Americans. Bhanot and the other attendants under her charge hid the passports of the 41 Americans on board – some under a seat and the rest down a rubbish chute.

After 17 hours, the hijackers opened fire and set off explosives. Bhanot opened the emergency door and helped a number of passengers escape. She could have been the first to jump out when she opened the door but she decided not to and was shot while shielding three children from a hail of bullets. Bhanot was recognized internationally as "the heroine of the hijack" and is the youngest recipient of the Ashok Chakra Award, India's most prestigious gallantry award for bravery during peace time.

Jessica Cox - First Pilot With No Arms

Jessica Cox proved YOU DON'T NEED 'WINGS' TO FLY the first pilot with no arms

The 32-year-old, who was born with a rare non-genetic birth defect that left her without arms, has never let her disability hold her back. Growing up, Cox did it all, from swim lessons to girl scouts, modeling, tap dancing and Taekwondo — at the age of 14, she'd already earned a black belt.

"I can't believe how much I did growing up. Every single day after school there was something going on. I don't know how my parents did it," Cox told TODAY. "I was expected to learn to do things like everybody else in my own way, which worked out just fine."

Becoming a pilot wasn't always a dream for Cox, but after going up in a single engine airplane with a fighter pilot several years ago, she was inspired to overcome her initial fears."Being up in the air put me on edge, but that quickly went away," she said. "It still keeps me on edge, which I like."

Not only is Cox the first person to fly a plane without arms, but she also holds the title of the first person without arms to receive a black belt in the American Taekwondo Association.

Cox said that while titles and awards are "the icing on top," they're not the driving force behind her career path. She takes pride in knowing that she inspires others to see past physical limitations that people tend to put on themselves.

"I do what I do because I love to do it," she said "and I don't give up."

Malala Yousafzai : Youngest Noble Prize Winner

Attacked for Going to School


On 9 October 2012, as Malala and her friends were travelling home from school, a masked gunman entered their school bus and asked for Malala by name. She was shot with a single bullet which went through her head, neck and shoulder. Two of her friends were also injured in the attack.

Malala survived the initial attack, but was in a critical condition. She was moved to Birmingham in the United Kingdom for treatment at a hospital that specialises in military injuries. She was not discharged until January, 2013 by which time she had been joined by her family in the UK.

The Taliban's attempt to kill Malala received worldwide condemnation and led to protests across Pakistan. In the weeks after the attack, over 2 million people signed a right to education petition, and the National Assembly swiftly ratified Pakistan's first Right To Free and Compulsory Education Bill.

Captain Vikram Batra - Hero among many heroes of the Kargil War

Crazy! Brave! Inspiring Indian!
Name: Shaheed Captain Vikram Batra

Also known as Sher Shah, Captain Vikram Batra joined the Indian Military Academy in June 1996 at Dehradun. After graduating in December 1997, he joined the army as a Lieutenant of 13 JAK Rifles at Sopore, Jammu & Kashmir. 

June 1, 1999, his unit proceeded to the Kargil Sector where by now war like situation had erupted. The first task assigned to the young officer was the recapture of Point 5140, which was at an altitude of 17000 feet. 

Upon reaching the point he got into a cheeky conversation with a terrorist commander on the radio. The enemy commander challenged him by saying, “Why have you come Sher Shah (Vikram’s nick name given by his commanding officer), you will not go back”. Captain Vikram Batra with immense confidence replied, “We shall see within one hour, who remains on the top”. 

In a short while Captain Vikram Batra and his company of troops killed 8 enemy soldiers and captured a heavy anti-aircraft machine gun. Mission Point 5140 was a success!!
Soon after the victory of Point 5140 he radioed his commanding officer and said victoriously “Yeh Dil Maange More”( The heart wants more). 

“Yeh Dil Maange More” became the catch line for the war! 

With the victory of Point 5140 cleared the Srinagar-Leh highway, which led to capturing of Point 5100, 4700 Junction, Three Pimples and the ultimate prize- Tiger Hill. 

After taking rest for couple of days he was sent for the task of capturing Point 4750, where he was engaged in the fiercest battle since the war had started. Vikram was challenged by an enemy officer, “Shershah, nobody shall be left to lift your bodies” to which Captain Vikram replied, “Don’t you worry about us, Pray for your safety.” Point 4750 was captured in no time adding one more victory to the count of Captain Vikram Batra. 

Captain Batra was on a victory rampage, his heart asking for more honor and victory. He stoutly volunteered for the next mission, which was very crucial. It was the capture of Point 4875 at an altitude of 17000 feet. He went for the mission along with his company and another led by Captain Anuj Nayyar. 

A number of enemy troops were killed in this mission. On 5th July 1999 Point 4875 was captured. But the enemy troops set in for a counter attack on 7th July 1999 which was well retaliated by Captain Batra. In all this action one of his junior officers (Lieutenant Naveen) has severely injured his leg. 

Captain Vikram Batra went for his rescue. While dragging Lieutenant Naveen back under cover he pleaded to Captain Batra to let him continue the fight in spite the injuries to which Captain Batra heroically replied “Tu baal bachedaar hai!! Hatt jaa peeche”, (You have kids and wife to look after! Get back). 

It didn't take long for this war hero to realize that he had been hit in the chest by an enemy bullet and then in a split of a second he was hit by a artillery splinter in the waist region. This great martyr gave away his last breath with “Jai mata di” (Long Live Mother Durga) on his lips. Before succumbing to his injuries he killed 5 more enemy soldiers. 

For his display of bravery he was awarded Param Vir Chakra, India’s highest medal for gallantry. His father G.L Batra received the medal from the President of India on behalf of his brave son.

Marc Marquez

An inspirational story about never giving up!



​He was doing great at Circuit of the Americas qualifying, until the last 3 minutes... His bike dies on the pit straight when he was at his best and leading the scoreboard...

And... Now what he does next, teaches us a lesson about how to face the odds and evolve as a champion !!!

This 22-year-old two-time MotoGP champ decides to leap over the wall and run down the pit lane to grab his backup bike.

Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948)




Home: India

The leader of the Indian independence movement, Gandhi Ji learned a non-violent form of protest while visiting in South Africa that he later developed in the uprisings he lead for India’s independence from British rule.

His style of protest became the model after which Martin Luther King, Jr. styled his protests for civil rights. Gandhi’s simplistic lifestyle and campaigns for the poorest Indian citizens not only endeared him to the people.

Mother Teresa


Mother Teresa (1910-1997)

Home: Macedonia

Mother Teresa joined a group of missionary nuns working in India, where she took her vows of a nun.

From childhood, she felt the call of God and the desire to help others. In India, she started a school for the poorest children. In 1950, she started her own religious order, The Missions of Charity," specifically to care for the people that no one else wanted to look after. She devoted her entire life to the poorest citizens, earning numerous awards throughout her lifetime–including the Pope John XXIII Peace Prize in 1971 and the Nehru Prize in 1972.

Usain St. Leo Bolt



For me, I'm focused on what I want to do. I know what I need to do to be a champion, so I'm working on it.




Amitabh Bachchan - The Legend




A blockbuster performer at the Bollywood box-office, Amitabh Bachchan's career tanked along with his production house, Amitabh Bachchan Corporation Limited (ABCL). His meteoric rise and quick downfall is a true Bollywood tale within Bollywood. He was bankrupt but did not give up and continued to fight. It was at this crucial juncture when his career took at 360 degree turn with the arrival of KBC series in India and slowly, he once again rose to the top. Big B truly proved that nothing, not even a simple desi hairoil advert is "beneath" you but in any profession respect is earned by your skills and your attitude.